Seawater Redefined

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What do you think of when see the term “seawater”? Salty water? Perhaps fish-poo-covered-bacterial-ooze-slime-haven-so-salty-I-puke-in-my-snorkel-every-time-it-touches-my-tongue? Well, the definition of seawater...

Is it all over for corals?

A recent study published in Science Express by Dr. Kent Carpenter of Old Dominion University and a consortium of nearly thirty coral reef ecologists has determined that one-third of coral face increased extinction threat due to anthropogenic influences. Carpenter refers to the problem as the “the human meteor”.

Will climate change have negative effects on deep-sea corals?

Seawater chemistry is changing with the addition of fossil fuel CO2 to the atmosphere. This influx of CO2 is causing the world’s oceans to become more acidic, which is bad news for corals and other marine organisms that use calcium carbonate to build their skeletons and protective shells.

Ice-free Arctic by the year 2030

Spring is in the air. Spring Break is upon us, and the mind begins to wander… to the poles? Well, yes, because researchers are now predicting a seasonally ice-free Arctic by the year 2030. Break out the kayaks and sunscreen. It’s “Wild on, Nuuk.”

TGIF: Iceberg sails past New Zealand (2006)

When was the last time your local news station sent out reporter by helicopter to land on an iceberg floating offshore? One of the intrepid chaps sums it up nicely,… “all my life I wanted to go to the Antarctic, now the Antarctic’s come to me.”

Will ocean acidification affect deep-water corals?

The global ocean has already taken up half of the atmospheric carbon dioxide produced by humans over the last 200 years, so the ongoing effects of climate change are dampened. That’s right, you can thank the ocean for saving the planet so far.