Dr. Kim Martini

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Kim Martini is a physical oceanographer at the Joint Institute for the Studyof the Atmosphere and Ocean at the University of Washington in Seattle, where she studies internal waves and turbulence. Currently she is focusing on how sea ice loss could alter physical and biogeochemical processes in the Arctic.

After receiving her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2010, she moved to Fairbanks, Alaska for a postdoc. After three years of awesome wilderness living, she moved back to Seattle.Kim’s other passion is

new and novel ocean observing technologies. Quite simply, her goal in life is to throw expensive s**t into the ocean. She also believes that broad scale data dissemination is a vital, but often overlooked, part of oceanographic research. Her goal is to create simple and universal tools to not only quickly process data, but for researchers to easily share these data using standardized public repositories.

 

7 comments on “Dr. Kim Martini
  1. Pingback: Life Oceanographic: Interview With Dr. Kim Martini | Marinexplore Blog

  2. I just read your article ‘True facts about Fukushima’ and I thank you for such a great post — I am one who has been freaking out and found the article comforting. My question is, what are your thoughts of all the sea life dying along the west coast and Alaska?

    Thank you,
    Tony Chester

  3. I just read your article ‘True facts about Fukushima’ and like the person above I thank you for such an informative article. I am quite new to this topic so I apologize if I say anything incorrectly. I am very concerned about the levels of radiation on the West Coast and am conflicted between what I read in your article and a video I recently watched. I have posted the link below. In your article you state that the current level of radiation on the West Coast is far below background radiation levels. I recently watched a video where a man takes the piece of equipment used to measure radiation down to the beach in SF and gets very different results from those you stated. According to his equipment the radiation levels were almost 3 times normal background radiation. Do you believe this is reason for concern? If you could please respond to me and either calm or confirm my fears I would greatly appreciate it. I know you are probably busy but this would be a great kindness. Thank you!
    http://topinfopost.com/2013/12/26/fukushima-radiation-hits-san-francisco

  4. Thank you so very much for your ‘True facts about Fukushima’ article.

    SO much fear-mongering, including the video that the previous poster mentioned about this event. It’s good to have some reason injected into the infostream.

    In response to the previous poster, note that the detector that the person is using is measuring in CPM, that’s counts-per-minute and how that translates to μSv (micro-Seiverts) depends on the isotope to which the meter is calibrated (and whether it’s properly calibrated), from my understanding (which is, admittedly fairly limited).

    It would have been more informative if they had the meter set to read in μSv/hr (which that meter is capable of doing), though probably FAR less shocking.

    Thank you again, Dr. Martini. You are my hero of the week!

  5. Dr. Martini,
    Thanks for the clear and easy to understand article,”True Facts About Fukushima”. I was so impressed I had to find out who you were to make certain you were creditable, you are. You glow!

  6. Pingback: Discussing science writing and communication | ClimateSnack

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