Climate science and poetry collide in the IPCC Haiku

Haven’t had time to read all 2000+ pages of the 2013 IPCC report? Neither have I! But don’t worry, physical oceanographer Greg Johnson has taken the time to condense and clarify the main talking points. Even better, he has gone one step further than just digesting the science. This is the IPCC report rewritten in the compact form of Japanese Haiku and illustrated with whimsical water colors.

Someone needs to make a watercolor plotting function for R/Matlab/Python right now!
[source: http://daily.sightline.org/2013/12/16/the-entire-ipcc-report-in-19-illustrated-haiku/]

This stroke of science prose genius came to Greg while he stuck sick at home one weekend (apparently we all need to go lick a bus seat right now to gain an infectious disease and some inspiration) and he was encouraged by his daughter to channel his inner Georgia O’Keefe and paint the accompanying water colors.  I’ve posted some of my favorites, but you can check them all out and learn some more about this fun idea came to be at daily.sightline.org

[source: http://daily.sightline.org/2013/12/16/the-entire-ipcc-report-in-19-illustrated-haiku/]

 

And why let all the oceanographers have the fun? Here’s one I came up with:

And then there is this little gem from @SurtLab

Everyone should totally try their hand at an IPCC haiku. Remember, it’s 3 lines with 5, 7, and 5 syllables in each.

Kim Martini (84 Posts)

Kim is a Physical Oceanographer at the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean at the University of Washington. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2010. Her goal in life is to throw expensive s**t in the ocean. When not at sea, she uses observations from moored, satellite and land-based instruments to understand the pathways that wind and tidal energy take from large (internal tides) to small scales (turbulence).





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