Contemplating a Career Change

If marine biologist are the rock stars of science then marine archaeologists may be the millionaires.

Deep-sea explorers said Friday they have mined what could be the richest shipwreck treasure in history, bringing home 17 tons of colonial-era silver and gold coins from an undisclosed site in the Atlantic Ocean. Estimated value: $500 million.


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In this photo provided by Odyssey Marine Exploration, Odyssey co-founder Greg Stemm, left, examines coins recovered from the “Black Swan” shipwreck with an unidentified member of the conservation team Thursday, May 17, 2007, at an undisclosed location. (AP Photo/Odyssey Marine Exploration)

Dr. M (1630 Posts)

Craig McClain is the Assistant Director of Science for the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, created to facilitate research to address fundamental questions in evolutionary science. He has conducted deep-sea research for 11 years and published over 40 papers in the area. He has participated in dozens of expeditions taking him to the Antarctic and the most remote regions of the Pacific and Atlantic. Craig’s research focuses mainly on marine systems and particularly the biology of body size, biodiversity, and energy flow. He focuses often on deep-sea systems as a natural test of the consequences of energy limitation on biological systems. He is the author and chief editor of Deep-Sea News, a popular deep-sea themed blog, rated the number one ocean blog on the web and winner of numerous awards. Craig’s popular writing has been featured in Cosmos, Science Illustrated, American Scientist, Wired, Mental Floss, and the Open Lab: The Best Science Writing on the Web.





5 comments on “Contemplating a Career Change
  1. Well turtle biologist definitely puts you on the top rung of the marine biologist ladder. Sadly, although honestly, I am probably on the lower rung as I study the muddy seafloor. Conservation angle makes you Bono!

  2. Pingback: Shipwrecked flagship HMS Victory discovered | Deep Sea News

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